Open Access Case study

Financial Analysis of Carp (Cyprinus carpio) Hatchery Business (Case Study in Ciparay Sub-District, Bandung District, West Java, Indonesia)

Iwang Gumilar, Adinda Elsha Akmalya, Yayat Dhahiyat, Asep Agus Handaka Suryana

Asian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Research, Page 35-45
DOI: 10.9734/ajfar/2021/v15i330332

Carp (Cyprinus carpio) hatchery cultivation is one of the business activities carried out by the community in Ciparay District, Bandung Regency. This research aims to analyze the financial feasibility of carp hatchery cultivation in Ciparay District, Bandung Regency. This research was conducted using a case study method consisting of primary data and secondary data. Primary data obtained from interviews with respondents and secondary data obtained from related agencies. This research uses 38 respondents as samples based on the sampling method (purposive sampling). The analysis used in this research is descriptive quantitative. The results obtained from this research are carp hatchery cultivation in Ciparay District has a profit value of 164,225,000 IDR/year, Profitability of 217%, R/C of 3.2 and Payback Period of 33 days so it is feasible to run and develop. Carp hatchery cultivators in Ciparay District, Bandung Regency are indicated to be prosperous because they have a higher income than the Regional Minimum Wage of Bandung Regency.

Open Access Original Research Article

Effect of Dietary Lipid Sources on Feed Utilization, Growth Efficiency and Carcass Composition of Clarias gariepinus Juveniles

S. Nwakaji, B. S. Aliu, F. O. Nwose

Asian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Research, Page 1-9
DOI: 10.9734/ajfar/2021/v15i330327

This study was designed to investigate plant and animal lipid that can enhance feed utilization, growth, and survival of Clarias gariepinus Juveniles. Juveniles with mean weight 32.50±0.5g were stocked randomly to seven tanks replicated thrice, with each tank having seven fish each and were fed with the prepared diets with varied lipid. 40% crude protein and isocaloric diets with digestible energy of 2,933.76Kcal were formulated and labelled Diet 1-7 with different sources of plant and animal lipids. Diet 1, 2 and 3 contained palm oil, Groundnut oil and soybean oil respectively, while diet 4, 5 and 6 contained Pork lard, Cod Liver oil and Beef tallow. Diet 7 (Control diet without any lipid source).

The result showed that there was no significant difference (P>0.05) in Feed conversion ratio (FCR) and survival rates among the diets. The mean weight gain was highest in fish fed with pork lard (22.12g) while the lowest value of 15.36g was recorded in fish fed with soybean oil. Relative weight gains and feed intake showed no significant difference (P>0.05) between fish fed lipids of plant origin. However, there was significant difference (P<0.05) among fish fed lipids from animal origin. The Highest Total Cholesterol (28.18 mg/dl) was recorded in fish fed beef tallow as lipid sources while the least value of low-density cholesterol (value of 2.26 mg/dl) was recorded in fish fed with soybean oil. In conclusion, C. gariepinus was able to utilize animal-based lipid sources more in terms of growth and feed utilization while the lipid profile result of the individual carcass after the culture period showed that C. gariepinus fed lipid from plant sources had a slightly better cholesterol level than those fed lipid of animal sources.

Open Access Original Research Article

Profitability of Using Commercial Tilapia Feed to Produce Three Different Sizes of Nile Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.) Fingerlings in Ghana

F. A. Anani, E. Agbeko, P. D. K. Atsakpo, M. Johnson-Ashun, L. K. Osei, K. K. Donkor, A. F. Ayarika, E. Danquah

Asian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Research, Page 10-17
DOI: 10.9734/ajfar/2021/v15i330328

Aims: To determine the profitability of using a commercial tilapia feed to produce three different size ranges (1.0-1.9, 2.0-2.9 and 5.0-5.9 g) of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings in hapa-in-pond system.

Study Design: Completely randomized design.

Place and Duration of Study: The Aquaculture Research and Development Centre (ARDEC), Akosombo, of Water Research Institute (WRI) of Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Ghana, from March to May, 2020.

Methodology: Fish growth study was carried out in three (3) fine mesh netting hapas, each of dimensions 5.0 x 2.0 x 1.2 m. Nile tilapia fry at initial mean weight 0.03 ± 0.01 g were stocked at a density of 50 fish m-2 and they were fed at 20 % body weight five times daily. The feeding of the fish continued until those in all the 3 hapas attained a mean weight of at least 5.0 g. Then the experiment was terminated and all the survived fish in each hapa were harvested, counted, and their individual body weights were measured. Growth performance indicators and profitability of producing the various size categories (1.0-1.9, 2.0-2.9 and 5.0-5.9) were determined.

Results: The fry attained the target size ranges of 1.0-1.9, 2.0-2.9 and 5.0-5.9 g in 4, 6 and 9 weeks respectively. There were significant differences (ANOVA, P = 0.03) among final mean weights, weight gains, feed intakes, daily weight gains, feed efficiencies and harvested biomass among all size ranges, with those of 5.0-5.9 g being significantly higher (Tukey’s HSDT, P < 0.02). Sizes of fingerlings produced correlate positively with cost of feed used. The profit indices ranged from 2.57 to 10.22, with the highest recorded in the 1.0-1.9 g fingerlings and the least in those of 5.0-5.9 g.

Conclusion: The results indicated that, at the current Nile tilapia fingerlings cost and the time taken to produce the various size categories, the 1.0-1.9 g production is the most profitable.

Open Access Original Research Article

Analysis of Value Added of Catfish Meatballs in Bandung Regency, West Java, Indonesia

Iwang Gumilar, Syafira Ananda Widjaja, RuzkyIntan Pratama, Atikah Nurhayati

Asian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Research, Page 18-25
DOI: 10.9734/ajfar/2021/v15i330330

This research aims to find out the value added obtained from the process of processing catfish into catfish meatballs. This research was conducted on August 2021 in Bandung Regency. The method used is the case study with the sampling technique in the form of purposive sampling. The type of data that primary data and secondary data uses with observation and interview techniques, the data is analyzed descriptively quantitatively to measure the overall value added component that can answer the purpose of the research. The analysis method used to calculate value added is using the Hayami’s method. The results showed that the value added resulting from the processing of catfish meatballs creates an value added of 19,600 IDR/kilograms the ratio of value added to product value by 13% it means the price of catfish meatball increase 13% from the price of fresh catfish. It means, the value added of catfish meatball relatively still low. The strategic that used to increase the value added of catfish meatball i.e increasing in production, increasing in price, and decreasing in cost.

Open Access Original Research Article

Analysis of Value Added of Salted Little Tuna in Bandung Regency, West Java, Indonesia (The Case Study in Pindang Ikan Family Business)

Ayudya Primarini, Iwang Gumilar, . Junianto, Zuzy Anna

Asian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Research, Page 26-34
DOI: 10.9734/ajfar/2021/v15i330331

This study aimed to analyze the value-added of salted little tuna in Bandung Regency. The general method used in this research is the case study method. The data analysis method used is quantitative descriptive analysis. And to analyze the value-added, the Hayami’s methods were used. The research conduct in Bandung regency from July to August 2021. The results of this research show that value added of salted little tuna in Bandung regency is 27% it means the price of salted little tuna increase 27% from the price of fresh little tuna fish. So, the value-added of salted little tuna is relatively still low. The strategic that used to increase the value added of salted little tuna i.e., increasing in production, increasing in price, and decreasing in costs.